A quick follow up to the Midleton House post.

view of Holy Rosary Church with part of Midleton House, The Rock, and the Roxborough or Dungourney River in the foreground. This photo dates from after 1908, the year the church spire was completed. Note the extensive and elaborate gardens. (National Library of Ireland.)

View of Holy Rosary Church with part of Midleton House, The Rock, and the Roxborough or Dungourney River in the foreground. This photo dates from after 1908, the year the church spire was completed. The photo appears to have been taken on a summer evening, for the shadows are cast from the west. The camera was positioned on Lewis Bridge. Note the extensive and elaborate gardens to the side and behind Midleton House. (Eason Photographic Collection, National Library of Ireland.)

As you know our last post examined the history of the name Midleton House associated with two different houses, each on opposite banks of the Roxborough or Dungourney River in Midleton.  The National Library of Ireland has a lovely early twentieth century image showing part of Midleton House , The Rock. What is of note is not just the dominant position of the newly built Holy Rosary Church (spire completed in 1908) but the fine gardens around the house. Today there are a lot more large trees around the house.

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National Library of Ireland places Irish Catholic Parish Registers online.

Holy Rosary Church, Midleton, County Cork (diocese of Cloyne). Built between  1894 and 1896 (spire completed 1907/08) this replaced St John the Baptist Catholic Chapel, which, in turn, replaced St Mary's Chapel in 1803. However, only the registers from 1819 have survived - the older registers were lost when the then bishop described them as unacceptable.

As of 1.00pm Irish time today, the National Library of Ireland has placed its microfilm records of the Irish Catholic parish registers online.  This is a HUGE step forward in making genealogical resources available to people who cannot visit Ireland or who don’t have the time to visit the NLI in Dublin.  And all this despite the savage cutbacks in government funding for the NLI in recent years!  It’s a truly heroic achievement, so well done to all the people involved. Now all they need is a sponsor to do with the microfilm what the National Archives did with the 1901/1911 census records – make them more interactive and more readily searchable!

I’ll post more on this later, but before you dive in please remember – read the FAQs carefully!

Happy hunting – and it IS a hunt!

Link: http://registers.nli.ie/

National Library of Ireland Digitisation Project of Parish Registers

The National Library of Ireland, today announced an ambitious digitisation project, which will make all parish registers in its collection available online by summer 2015. The images will be black and white scans of the microfilms for each parish.

Access to the information will be free and through a special website to be launched mid 2015.

 

Press Release: http://www.nli.ie/en/list/press-releases.aspx